Ash Bowls – 8/30/17

IMG_2020I was given two nice pieces of White Ash from West Virginia. There is a very neat story behind the wood. Apparently, the wood was originally given to my friend by a timber buyer who purchases wood for the Boston Symphony among other people…

Anyways, this was my first time working with Ash. I had a little trouble getting the smooth edge on the end grain, but an overall enjoyable experience. The picture above shows two different colors. The one on the left is picking up the natural light from the window. The larger bowl on the right is reflecting the light from the overhead lights.

The first of the two bowls is about 10.5 inches with a high gloss tung oil finish.

The second bowl is about 12 inches. It also has a high gloss tung oil finish.

Plates – 8/21/17

IMG_1962Now that the fall garden is planted and sprouting, I’ve been able to get back to the wood shop. After my wife gave me the lathe for Father’s Day, I gave a lot of attention to turning bowls and chalices. I’ve done a couple of small plates, but I have not had the time or the opportunity to work on larger plates that would work well for patens. Since I would like to start making communion sets, I’ve been wanting to work on some plates/patens.

Below are pictures of three plates I recently finished. I started to feel a little more comfortable with the process by the third plate! The biggest challenge I experienced was turning the underside of the plate — I ended up leaving a small rim to elevate the plates off of the table. Still, I am going to need to give a little more attention to smoothing out the surface of the plate.

This first plate is made from African Zebrawood. It is a little over 9 inches in diameter. It was very fun to work with this Zebrawood. I have about thee more pieces of it left, so I will probably be working with it again pretty soon.

The second plate is a segmented piece consisting of Walnut and Poplar. It is about 10 inches in diameter. The gluing process was not too difficult, but there are a few gaps. I went with a simply design, but I like how this plate turned out.

I am not sure what type of wood is used in this third plate. It came from a box of scrap pieces from Berlin G. Myers…good people. It is around 11 inches.

Cedar Bowl – 8/16/17

IMG_1935My father came across a cedar tree on a pile of debris earlier this summer. I’ve been able to use this particular cedar tree in several projects already.

I cut one of the logs into blanks a few weeks ago. The piece of wood I used for this bowl was among those blanks.

I have been excited to see what could come off this particular piece of wood! The blank was cut at the point of an emerging branch. Due to its dual-tone grain, cedar already offers interesting patterns. I was especially interested, however, to see what affect the darker branch would have to the overall look of the bowl! I will include a picture (with a different filter) of the inside of the bowl, which shows the variant in tones between the lighter living tissue, the redness of the core, and the darker branch at the base of the bowl. Once more, I have left the wormholes in the living tissue for added character.

Gavel – 8/9

I don’t believe my father is accustomed to using a gavel in his courtroom, but I wanted to turn one for him to have, at least, for display.

This particular gavel is a bit different from traditional looking gavels, but it is what I imagined. I thought I would put some rounded beads in it, but I like the look of the lines so I left them as they are.

The gavel was turned from the piece of Sapele my sister gave to me, which my father thought was pretty cool.

Also included are some pictures of a small bud vase I gave to my mother turned out of oak.

Botched Bowl & Vase – 8/8

IMG_1838I am not sure if it I turned a vase or a candlestick holder. Whatever it turned out to be, my wife apparently liked it enough to place it on the mantle!

I started with a section of a branch from a Magnolia tree. I intended to turn a bud vase, but the particular tool I used to cut the inside wall was not sufficient enough to cut to the bottom of the vase. The outside wall was so thin that I did not want to risk another cutting technique. When I get an extension for the drill chuck, I will come back and make a deeper cut.

I began working on a spalted Oak bowl a little over a week ago. The Oak was still green when I cut into it, so I used a microwave to quick dry the wood before shaping it. I also experimented with CC glue to fill the cracks that had formed during the drying process.

The final piece was not nearly smooth as I would have liked! There was a great deal of tear out on the end grain. I eventually set the bowl to the side because I was growing frustrated.  In the meantime, it has been quite functional in the kitchen!

The Life of a Seed, Part Four

SeedThe life of a seed has much to do with the receptivity and the response of the soil. And, in the same way, our receptivity and the responsiveness has an effect on the proclamation of Jesus.

The series, The Life of a Seed, has explored the Parable of the Sower with the intention of understanding how a seed grows into a fruit producing plant. Grasping the considerable influence the ground has upon the life of a seed enables us to know the deeper meaning of Jesus’ teaching. Continue reading

Communion Set – 8/2

IMG_1801I’ve seen a lot of pictures of segmented bowls, goblets, plates, and other turned pieces and I have been insterested in the process creating a “laminated” or “segmented” piece.

I was presented with the opportunity to experiment with lamination last night. After getting the boys to bed, I went outside to work on an idea for a communion set.

My sister had given me a piece of 2.5″ x 2.5″ Sapele, which I have been able to use for a smaller chalice, but I was not sure how I could use the same wood to create a paten to turn a complete set.

I decided to cut a piece of the Sapele in half and glue Spruce between the two pieces of Sapele to create a larger diameter for the paten. I must say, I was incredibly surprised to see how strong the glue held the pieces together!

I was encouraged with the results as I ultimately would like to be able to work on more communion sets. This experimentation with lamination will certainly create the possibility for different designs.

 

Cedar Bowl – 8/1

IMG_1733I was able to get a little time in the wood shop this morning before heading out to make visits. The past month has seen some extremely humid mornings, but today was unusually comfortable for this time of year which made for a pleasant morning.

I returned to a piece of the cedar found on Edisto Beach. This particular piece had a limb coming out of it,  which made for an interesting design on the outside wall of the bowl.