The Life of a Seed, Part Four

SeedThe life of a seed has much to do with the receptivity and the response of the soil. And, in the same way, our receptivity and the responsiveness has an effect on the proclamation of Jesus.

The series, The Life of a Seed, has explored the Parable of the Sower with the intention of understanding how a seed grows into a fruit producing plant. Grasping the considerable influence the ground has upon the life of a seed enables us to know the deeper meaning of Jesus’ teaching.

The previous messages in the series resisted the urge to move quickly to Jesus’ explanation of the parable so that we might pause and reflect upon the instruction of Jesus associated with the Parable of the Sower. This reflection saw an emphasis placed upon the need for the crowds (and, to an extent, the disciples) to “see” and “hear” the proclamation of Jesus.

The interpretation given to this instruction to “see” and “hear” was a need for anyone who encounters the proclamation of Jesus to “receive” and “respond” to the proclamation of Jesus – or, more simply, to be attentive to the proclamation of Jesus.

As a result, we discover a choice is presented to anyone who encounters the proclamation of Jesus: one can “see” and hear” – one can receive and respond to the Word of God proclaimed by Jesus. Or, one can choose to reject or neglect his proclamation…

Our final message allows us the opportunity to finally reflection upon the explanation of Jesus, whereby he addresses each of the four soils upon which the seed is sown: the path; the rocky soil; among the thorns; and, the good soil.

Each of these soils receives and responds to the sown seed in a different manner and to a different effect!

In the end, we learn the parable is not about a negligent sower or an insufficient seed; rather, we discover a generous sower who sows out of the abundance of seed so that all may have the opportunity to receive and respond!

And, the same in true for us! The Word of God has been sown into our hearts by a generous God about of his abundant grace. This Word is most profoundly sown through the proclamation of Jesus (which we encounter in Scripture; through the tradition of the Apostolic faith; within our experience; and, through the gift of reason). Encountering the proclamation of Jesus presents us with an opportunity to choose how we will receive and respond. Be encouraged, therefore, to “see” and “hear” … to receive and respond … to be attentive to a greater truth.

Listen to Part Four of The Life of a Seed.

Previous messages in this series:

  1. Part One
  2. Part Two
  3. Part Three

Speck: Choosing to See with Compassion and Empathy

fontcandy“Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye? Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye. — Matthew 7:1-5

I got a speck of saw dust in my eye yesterday. The speck posed an annoyance yesterday evening as Ginny and I sat down to watch America’s Got Talent. I did not mess with my eye, figuring the speck would be flushed out when I slept later that night.

I woke up this morning in a bit of discomfort. The speck had not flushed out. Worse, the speck was rubbing against my eye forming tiny scratches. I tried a couple different approaches to remove the speck: rubbing my eye (not a good idea); wiping the eye lid; eye drops; and, flushing my eye with water. Nothing seemed to help. The speck remained and the discomfort increased as my eye became more bloodshot.

While delivering his “sermon on the mount,” Jesus asks his disciples, “Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s, but do not notice the log in your own eye?” (Matthew 7:3)

The question is asked so Jesus can further encourage his disciples to first remove the log from their eye so they may see clearly to take the speck out of their neighbor’s eye.

These words are likely familiar to many of you. Jesus uses the imagery of speck/log in reference to the human tendency to judge others. The point of Jesus is to first attend to one’s shortcomings before addressing the shortcomings of others. Or, a more strident reading of this teaching suggests Jesus commands his disciples to attend to their sinful tendencies against the tendency to judge the sinfulness of others. And, of course, this is a teaching that speaks beyond the Twelve to all followers of Jesus — Judge not, lest ye not be judged! 

While judging others is certainly the central issue, Jesus makes a comment towards the end of his teaching, which brings another point into view. Jesus instructs his disciples to remove the log from their eye so they might see clearly to remove the speck out of the eye of their neighbor (Matthew 7:5).

Jesus does identify the ability to assist in the removal of a speck from the eye of a neighbor. The emphasis is a matter of one’s approach: do not seek to call out (judge) others for the specks that limits the view; but rather, approach your neighbor with compassion and empathy as one who knows the pain of having one’s sight blinded by a log!!

A little speck of saw dust is still floating around in my eye. It is uncomfortable; and, it is limiting my ability to see clearly.

Our tendency towards sin is no different. Sin limits our ability to see clearly. Sin blurs our view of God and it disrupts our ability to see and live into our relationship with God through Jesus. Life lived out of rhythm with God through Jesus Christ can be extremely uncomfortable.

That is the point we often miss!

Judging others is not just unhealthy, because it points out the flaws of another without acknowledging the faults of our own. Judging is ineffective! (Dare I say, negligent?)

When we choose to judge, we are choosing to withhold compassion and empathy from our neighbor. We forget the smallest speck can cause a great deal of discomfort and limit one’s vision.

When we choose to judge, we miss the opportunity to serve the well-being of our neighbor – to honor the pain they carry; to comfort them in their distress; or, to offer them a guiding hand.

I guess, at the end of it all, its a matter of the way you choose to see things…

Are you able to see clearly with the love of God? Or, is there a speck in your eye blurring your vision?

Blessings,
RC

Rise, Let Us Be On Our Way

Not able to make it to a worship service this morning?

Feeling a little uninspired?

That is okay!

Because, sometimes we just feel a little uninspired.

But, have a listen to the message Rise, Let Us Be On Our Way.

Because, there is peace for us still…!

 

Mothers Moving Mountains

Mothers Moving MountainsWhat if your lack of patience is actually the presence of faith?

Parenting is difficult.

Parenting certainly requires patience.

Because parenting requires patience, there will be times when a parent’s patience feels a little thin…

The presumed lack of patience does not have to signal inadequacy as a parent! What if the lack of patience distracting a parent’s heart is actually the presence of her faith?!

Patience has its place within parenting, but it is not the most significant component of healthy parenting! The faith of the parent is the most influential aspect of healthy parenting – the parent’s faith in God; the parent’s faith in herself as a parent; and the parent’s faith in the potential of her child!

The thinning of patience may actually be the revelation of one’s faith in her child – the belief in the potential of her child to grow into an even more amazing person!

The faith of a parent – faith in God, self, and child – has the ability to do the impossible. A little faith has the power to move a mountain…faith has the ability to move a child into adulthood!!!

So, the next time you find yourself praying for patience…maybe don’t! Rather, ask God to strengthen your faith – in God, in yourself, and in your child.

If you would like to hear more, check out this week’s message, Mothers Moving Mountains. Consideration is given to the amazing influence mothers have upon the hearts of their children…and, the how faith strengthens a mother to move a mountain!

Lifted Up: Overcoming the Isolation of Weakness

Jlifted upesus came and took her by the hand and lifted her up… — Mark 1:31a

Illness holds an incredible power over the human body and spirit – illness is exhausting. The illness starving our bodies and spirits could be physical or mental. Either way, illness has the same debilitating effect. The ill are drained and forced into the isolation of weakness.

“Jesus came and took her by the hand and lifted her up,” (Mark1:31a) provokes a hopeful image. Jesus’ extending of a hand to a woman who is at her weakest signals a message of hope for anyone who knows this exhaustion. Offering a hand of strength, comfort, and assurance transfers a power untouched by modern medicine. Reaching out to another in their weakness is transformative.

Jesus offers his hand to the mother-in-law of Simon Peter. While this miracle story is not the first of Jesus’ deeds of power in the gospel of Mark, the care and concern he shows to this feeble woman is the first of his “healing miracles” in Mark’s account of Jesus’ life and ministry.

A fever had overtaken this woman. Her illness brought her to fragility, confining her to the bed. Jesus sees the woman in her weakness and he reaches out to her.

Mark seems to make a statement with this first healing miracle. He offers his audience a clear impression of Jesus of Nazareth: Jesus is a man with the authority of divine power, who chooses to reach out to people when they are at their weakest; and, therfore, we can all trust that God reaches out to us in our weakness through Jesus. 

Jesus takes the woman by the hand. He holds her. He connects himself to her in her weakness. He believes for her. He believes in God and the power of God to heal. But, Jesus also believes in in the woman. Jesus believes in her potential to be moved from weakness to strength. He believes in the power of God to deliver this woman from her fragility and to raise her to a newness of life! He believes in her ability to be lifted up!

In faith, he took her by the hand and…

He lifted her up.

Accepting the hand of strength, comfort, and assurance offered to us in our weakness is not easy. Relying upon God, trusting in the power of God, believing in the freeing power of God’s love is not easy for all of us. Believing God would determine us worthy of this hand of power is even more of an obstacle. And, yet, in your weakness you will discover this hand of God is not only being offered to you, it has already taken hold of your hand.

Accept the hand that is holding you and know the power it provides.

Be lifted up…

But, allow yourself to be lifted up to a newness of life so that you might become the hand of God for another, who is drained, feeble, and forced into the isolation of weakness. Reach out to others in their weakness with the hand of strength, comfort, and assurance that you know possesses the power to lift up.

 

Together

TogetherHave you ever wondered what a cucumber plant could teach us about the Christian community?

Well, take a moment and listen to this past week’s message, Together, and learn how intertwining our life can help us grow to a greater exposure of the Son.

The Imperishable Inheritance

ImperishableBeing alive to God is a lot like biting into a freshly picked strawberry — it is tasting the beauty of God’s glory in the simple and the subtle of the present; but, the fruit we taste does more than reveal the beauty of God (and the newness of life with God in Christ), the fruit we taste is actually the seed for the abundant inheritance growing for us in heaven!

My previous post, Life Resurrected, shared a link to a sermon from a couple of years ago. The message considered what it means to be alive to God.

As I wrote, “Being alive to God does not always look or feel like the grand or the spectacular; rather, being alive to God is often experienced in the simple, the subtle, and the serene…like biting into a freshly picked strawberry!”

And, in the message I shared how biting into a freshly picked strawberry awakened my senses to the power of God’s glory!

In this week’s message, The Imperishable Inheritance, I return to the story of the strawberry! The fruit we taste in this present life, which reveals the beauty of God’s glory, is actually the seed for the abundant inheritance growing for us with God in Christ!

If you have a moment, have a listen to the message, The Imperishable Inheritance, from a couple of weeks ago! Blessings to you all!

Life Resurrected: Being Alive to God in the Simplicity and the Subtly of a Strawberry

Strawberry“I thought to myself, ‘This is the best strawberry I’ve ever had in my life.” Not because of where it came from, but because of what it came to represent for me…In that moment, I tasted what God has to offer: the beauty of the now; the very natural; the blessing of what is already before us. And, there before me was the beauty of God’s creation, the beauty of God’s presence, in a simple strawberry.”

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Hope is Healing

Hope is HealingHe is risen!

In his being raised from the dead, all of us are able to discover the hope of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

The hope born on this day of resurrection is a hope infused with the grace of God.

The hope extended to us on this day of resurrection possesses the divine power to create a newness of life.

May your Easter be filled by the joy of the resurrection and its hope for a newness of life.

May you experience the strength, comfort, and joy it offers.

If you are not able to make it to a church service this morning, I would like to invite you to listen to Hope is Healing, which is a message prepared for Easter of 2015.

Blessings to you all on this wonderful day of resurrection. Alleluia!

On the Road to the Cross – The Two Bandits

9781501822643In the fifth message of the series On the Road to the Cross, consideration is given to the two bandits crucified on either side of the cross of Jesus.

The taunts of these men, which were similar to the taunts of the religious leaders, present us with the opportunity to consider the manner in which we might taunt Jesus.

Do we mock Jesus when we claim him as Christ, but attempt to control  the presence of Jesus in our life?

Take a moment to listen to this week’s message!

Note – This sermon series is influenced by Rob Burkhart’s recent publication, On the Road to the Cross: Experience Easter with Those who were There. The book is a great read during the Season of Lent. I fully recommend you add this book to your library!!